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Published: 2018-11-29

Neuromuscular and Bounce Drop-Jump Responses to Different Inter-Repetition Rest Intervals during A Composite Training Session in Hurling Players

Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Science and Health, Institute of Technology Carlow, Carlow, Ireland.
Cardiff School of Sport and Health Sciences (Sport), Cardiff Metropolitan University, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom
Professor of Applied Biostatistics, Cardiff School of Sport and Health Sciences (Sport), Cardiff Metropolitan University, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom
Course Director and Lecturer, Department of Science and Health, Institute of Technology Carlow, Ireland
Neuromuscular stretch-shortening cycle recovery strength sprinting
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Abstract

The purposes of this study were to a) compare a 4-min to an 8-min rest interval between composite training (jump-sprint combination) repetitions in a single session to allow for the recovery of neuromuscular and bounce drop-jump (BDJ) performance and b) investigate if super compensation would occur after 168hrs of rest. Twelve players were randomly assigned to either a 4-min or an 8-min rest interval group. Participants first completed a BDJ test to identify individual BDJ drop heights followed by a 20m sprint test. Seventy-two hours later, a composite training session of two repetitions (three BDJs followed by a 20m sprint after a 15s rest) with either a 4-min or an 8-min rest interval was performed. A three repetition maximum (3RM) back squat strength test, a BDJ, countermovement jump (CMJ) and a sprint performance test were completed 10-mins pre- and immediately post-session, and 168 hrs post-session. CMJ force (8-min group) and BDJ (height and reactive strength index (RSI)) measures decreased significantly post-session (4-min and 8-min groups; P ? 0.05). Presession to 168 hrs post-session, relative 3RM back squat strength and 20m sprint performance increased significantly for the 4-min group only (P ? 0.05). In conclusion, a 4-min composite training inter-repetition rest interval leads to a significant decline in BDJ measures (RSI and jump height) which may act as fatigue markers for monitoring. However, 4-mins provides sufficient recovery during the session which, in conjunction with 168 hrs of recovery, causes super compensation in neuromuscular performance in hurling players.

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How to Cite

Byrne, P. J., Moody, J., Cooper, S.-M., & Kinsella, S. (2018). Neuromuscular and Bounce Drop-Jump Responses to Different Inter-Repetition Rest Intervals during A Composite Training Session in Hurling Players. International Journal of Physical Education, Fitness and Sports, 7(4), 1-12. https://doi.org/10.26524/ijpefs1841


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